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17 min read Kevin Ohashi
Community | john.onolan.org | Dec. 2, 2015

Thoughts on Calypso, WordPress and JavaScript

It’s important to point out, however, that Calypso is the single biggest vote of no-confidence in the existing WordPress architecture in the history of the platform.

Thoughts on Calypso, WordPress and JavaScript

Community | john.onolan.org | Dec. 2, 2015

Three years ago we sat down and tried to imagine what WordPress might look like if it was rebuilt from the ground up using modern technology - purely focused on publishing. It was an amazing problem to mull over, and one which we spent a long time thinking about. Eventually we came to the conclusion that the best possible way to do it would be entirely in JavaScript, specifically using Node.js. We called it Ghost. It’s going pretty well so far, but our downfall was predicted before we had even begun. The usual “Ghost will never be as ubiquitous as WordPress because it can’t be installed on shared hosting” — comments were made regularly (up until just a few days ago) about how hard it was to install Ghost relative to WordPress and its auto-installer glory.
But we never wavered in our stance, and we stayed true to our belief that the choice of technology we made had the best and the brightest future ahead of it.
As we launched our hosted platform, Ghost(Pro), I answered our most frequently asked question: Why doesn’t Ghost work on shared hosting?
Ten years ago, a little platform called WordPress launched into the world and started growing in popularity at a rate of knots. At the time,

Community | john.onolan.org | Oct. 1, 2014

Creating Open Source Culture

Another great opinion that I think is adding to today's open source contribution debate

Creating Open Source Culture

Community | john.onolan.org | Oct. 1, 2014

Jason Cohen once said that “Every company has a culture. The only question is whether or not you decide what it is.” - I couldn’t agree more. I think this can extend further, though, not just to companies but to any group of people working together. Bands have a culture, stereotypically defined by their genre of music. Sports teams have a culture. Towns and cities obviously have a culture. Even brands have a culture, not just internally, but externally as well (Like Red Bull). The word “culture” really comes down to any set of values which are adhered to and promoted by a group of individuals.
Either you choose a culture, or you end up with one.
Open source projects typically have a very strong (which is to say: clearly evident) culture. Unfortunately most of the time, in my experience, it’s not one which is consciously chosen.
The majority of open source projects start out as a couple of people hacking away to build a tool. Then occasionally they blossom and eventually grow into something far larger. The culture of the project evolves not with the codebase, but rather with the contributors who participate in writing it.
For open source projects, culture has nothing to do with what