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11 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | journal.rmccue.io | Feb. 16, 2016

The (Complex) State of Meta in the WordPress REST API

Ryan McCue wrote about the complex state of meta in relation with the WordPress REST API. Get to know what's going on and why.

The (Complex) State of Meta in the WordPress REST API

Development | journal.rmccue.io | Feb. 16, 2016

One of the other discussion points in our recent API meeting was the state of meta in the REST API. We recently made the somewhat-controversial decision to remove generic meta handling from the API. As we didn’t have time to get into the specifics in the meeting, I wanted to expand on exactly what we’re doing here, and our future plans.1 WordPress has four different types of meta: post meta, comment meta, term meta, and user meta. These broadly act the same, so for simplicity’s sake, I’ll be grouping them together as just “meta”.
Meta also falls into two broad groups: plugin data, and user input. The distinction here is that plugin meta is set by a plugin programmatically, whereas user input is set via the Custom Fields metabox. These are broad categorisations, but the general difference is that plugin meta tends to be “protected” (typically prefixed with an underscore), whereas user input meta is any sort of freeform name (and occasionally no name at all).
Solution for Plugin Data
Right now, there is a viable solution for plugins to handle meta through the REST API: register_rest_field(). This function allows registering extra fields on a resource (like a post) and handling them in

Community | journal.rmccue.io | Feb. 6, 2016

Progressive Enhancement with the WordPress REST API

Clarifying the meaning of progressive enhancement with the WP REST API.

Progressive Enhancement with the WordPress REST API

Community | journal.rmccue.io | Feb. 6, 2016

In a REST API discussion today, we discussed the future of the REST API. Something I touched upon briefly in that meeting is the concept of progressive enhancement with the REST API. Since this topic hasn’t been brought up much previously, I want to elaborate on how progressive enhancement works. Progressive enhancement is our key solution to a couple of related problems: forward-compatibility with future features and versions of WordPress, and robust handling of data types in WordPress. Progressive enhancement also unblocks the REST API project and ensures there’s no need to wait until the REST API has parity with every feature of the WordPress admin.
For instance, custom post types can do basically whatever they want with their data, so we wanted a robust system for indicating feature support via the REST API. For example, post types which don’t have the editor support flag won’t have content registered, similar to how the admin doesn’t show the content editor for those post types. In addition, plugins can do even crazier stuff like conditionally changing post types. The system in the REST API can handle these cases with ease, providing clients the ability to adapt on-the-fly to the

Development | journal.rmccue.io | Mar. 23, 2016

Patch WordPress Core via GitHub

Ryan McCue introduced "GitHub-to-Patch", a tiny utility, that let's you submit Pull Request to WordPress SVN Repo. Though its just a proof-of-concept project, but really deserve attention.

Patch WordPress Core via GitHub

Development | journal.rmccue.io | Mar. 23, 2016

A few days ago, I started tweeting about the Stack Overflow Developer Survey, where 74% of developers surveyed said they dread working with WordPress. I received a tonne of replies that I’m still working through, and I’ll post about that soon. One reply that did come up a few times was contributing via GitHub. Matt announced in the State of the Word that you’d soon be able to contribute to WP via pull requests, however that hasn’t happened so far. I had a few discussions with some of the core team about this, but alas it never got anywhere.
However, after this discussion, I realised I could do something about it right now as a proof-of-concept. Trac exposes an XML-RPC interface, and GitHub exposes a REST API, so hooking the two up only requires a minimal amount of code.
So, introducing GitHub-to-Patch, a tiny utility to allow submitting PRs to WordPress.
Here’s how you submit a pull request for WordPress using this:
Find the ticket on Trac you want to upload a patch to.
Submit a pull request to the WordPress/WordPress repo, then close it to keep GitHub clean. (You can still continue to update it.)
Head to the GitHub-to-Patch page.
Select your pull request.
Enter the ticket number.
Enter

Plugins | journal.rmccue.io | May. 25, 2015

How I Would Solve Plugin Dependencies

WordPress was not built with dependencies in mind, which cause some themes and plugins (like Jetpack) to grow huge. Very interesting thoughts by Ryan.

How I Would Solve Plugin Dependencies

Plugins | journal.rmccue.io | May. 25, 2015

23rd of May One of the longest standing issues with the plugin system in WordPress is how to solve the issue of dependencies. Plugins and themes want to bring in libraries, other plugins, or parent themes, but right now, the solutions are somewhat terrible. I thought it was time to get my thoughts down on (virtual) paper.
What’s the problem?
Software is invariably never built in isolation (“no man is an island”), so they are naturally drawn to using external libraries. Extending an existing system is also extremely useful; we can see that from the plugin ecosystem in WordPress itself.
However, right now, there’s no good way to do these in a way that interoperates with other plugins and sites. There are various third-party solutions, but often these require code duplication or offer a substandard user experience.
The Jetpack Problem
This lack of proper dependencies is one of the key reasons behind the system of ever-growing codebases, and is exactly why Jetpack is a gigantic plugin rather than being split out. In an ecosystem with a proper dependency system, Jetpack would simply be the “core” of other plugins, being depended on for core functionality, and offering UI to tie it all together.